New York Times and the United States of Conspiracy, Fraud, and Hypocrisy

We recently instructed our publisher to purchase a full-page ad in the New York Times promoting our Trilogy of books.


A representative of the NYT responded,


"I'm sorry we are unable to accept the ad. Our Standards Management says >>we don't accept ads that promote conspiracy theories. Thank you."


Below was the response from our publisher:



What is a conspiracy theory?


The answer will vary depending on whom you ask.


The orthodox definition of conspiracy is:


An act "to join in a secret agreement to do an unlawful or wrongful act or an act which becomes unlawful as a result of the secret agreement."


A conspiracy theory is generally accepted as:


"[A] theory that explains an event or set of circumstances as the result of a secret plot by usually powerful conspirators; a theory asserting that a secret of great importance is being kept from the public."


In our books, Pentateuch Illuminated—A Five Part Series Introducing A New American Scripture—How and Why the Real Illuminati® Created the Book of Mormon and A New American Scripture—How and Why the Real Illuminati® Created the Book of Mormon, we have provided strong evidence that our group was responsible for writing and publishing the Book of Mormon in the early part of the 19th century.


We have provided evidence that, after our attempts to convince Thomas Jefferson (an popular early American politician) and Ethan Smith (a local popular writer and preacher—no relation to Joseph Smith, Jr.) to help us had failed, we decided to recruit an American teenager—Joseph Smith Jr.— to represent us and be our public representative.


In providing this evidence, we clearly admitted and explained the events and set of circumstances that resulted in our own "secret plot" to introduce a new American scripture that countered and revised the orthodox early European-American Christian faith and the King James Bible, especially regarding the Native American peoples of the Western Hemisphere.


We explained, and provided substantial evidence, that we did this with the hope of influencing a better foundation of religion and government for the rapidly growing and flourishing United States of America.


We explained who we were, and how we introduced ourselves in the narrative of our new American scripture.


We explained that,


"[We] will be among the Gentiles (American and European Christians), and the Gentiles shall know [us] not. [We] will also be among the Jews, and the Jews shall know [us] not. (Book of Mormon, 3 Nephi 28:27–28.)


We presented our work as "great and marvelous work," thus registering and calling our work, a Marvelous Work and a Wonder®, as presented in various parts of the narrative of our new American scripture's prophecies.


It was our intent to fulfill all of the prophecies that we invented and included in our Book of Mormon.


One of the most important prophecies was the coming forth of The Sealed Portion of what we called the "gold plates." We fulfilled this prophecy in 2004 with the aid of another of our American recruits, Christopher.


Fraud can be an unlawful or wrongful act, if in perpetuating the fraud it leads to harm being caused to another person, especially by "obtaining money ... by false pretense or by impersonation."


Fraud in its most general sense means,


"A false representation of a matter of fact—whether by words or by conduct, by false or misleading allegations, or by concealment of what should have been disclosed—that deceives and is intended to deceive another so that the individual will act upon it to her or his legal injury."


Therefore,


The NYT was correct in objectifying our group's action as a conspiracy to "act to join in a secret agreement." But it cannot degrade and express our actions as "an unlawful or wrongful act or an act which becomes unlawful as a result of the secret agreement."


Yes, we admit and have provided a full transparency of our conspiratorial acts in creating a new American scripture. Our actions have the protection of the Constitution of the United States of America. This protection is afforded in a person's (or group's) right to the free exercise of religion and the freedom of speech.


In our book, The True History of Religion—How Religion Destroys the Human Race and What the Real Illuminati® Has Attempted To Do Through Religion To Save the Human Race, we have provided substantial evidence that all religions upon the earth are absolutely conspiratorial in nature and perpetuate fraudulent criminal acts upon humanity. (There isn't an organized religion on this earth that does not require some kind of monetary compensation, influenced directly by commandment or indirectly by the persuasion of guilt.)


On the contrary, our group has never asked for donations of any kind from anyone. Although there have been those who have approached us with the desire to help our work financially, NONE has been directly influenced by a commandment or guilt to donate money to our cause. All of our books are free to download without cost.


Therefore, shame on the Constitution of the United States of America and the NYT for supporting the conspiracy theories and fraud set forth by all of the worlds religions, all of which offer "a false representation of a matter of fact—whether by words or by conduct, by false or misleading allegations, or by concealment of what should have been disclosed—that deceives and is intended to deceive another so that the individual will act upon it to her or his legal injury"—representations that always include the criminal aspect of fraud by taking people's money to support these religions' fraud.


In the case of the Book of Mormon, should it have been disclosed that the narrative of this book is a fraudulent representation of the history of the Native American people, more particularly, as pointed out by our publisher's letter to the NYT, that this race was cursed with a dark skin because of the sins of their once-white ancestors?


In a court of law, could evidence be presented that would prove that the Book of Mormon's representations are true?


No.


Could we prove in a court of law, with substantial and overwhelming evidence, that the Book of Mormon was a 19th century invention for a particular purpose?


Yes.


In writing our books, it was our intent to tell the Real Truth® about the Book of Mormon by presenting a transparent explanation of why it was created, and how it was created. It was our desire to stop the criminal aspect of fraud perpetuated by the groups that use our new American scripture to take money from people.


The NYT has shown its true colors.


If the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS/Mormon) Church wanted to place a full-page ad in the NYT, promoting its false and misleading representations (fraud) of the Book of Mormon in order to gain converts—who if converted will be manipulated, by way of commandment (the disobedience of which can lead to eternal damnation), would it be allowed?


Yes!


Upon reading our books, hundreds of people have been convinced of the fraud that the United States of America's right to religious freedom has produced. These people, although few, have been convinced of the fraud, have left these religious organizations and no longer give money to these fraudulent institutions.


It's obvious that advertising money is more important to the NYT than publishing articles, or allowing the purchase of ads that might aid in helping people find out the fraudulent activities that are perpetuated against them in order to defraud them of their money.


A few days after the NYT rejected our publisher's request to purchase an ad to promote our works, on the front page of the NYT (online edition), this story headlined:


Heh-Heh. Huh-Huh. Mike Judge Brings Back ‘Beavis and Butt-Head.’


The NYT gives the American people and the world what they desire. They do not deserve the Real Truth®. They deserve to be continually defrauded, to their condemnation.


Truly, the New York Times and the United States of America are full of conspiracy, fraud, and hypocrisy.


—The Real Illuminati®